Friday, 4 July 2014

5,821 school pupils form a world record breaking human poppy on Southport beach

As the strains of Elgar's Nimrod drifted across a rain soaked beach 5,821 local school children stood in perfect silence to remember 'the fallen' from World War 1.  This afternoon they had broken the world record for forming a 'human poppy'
The world record breaking human poppy


All morning the pupils had been assembled on the beach taking part various WW1 activities; singing the old songs, marching up and down following the Duke of Lancaster's regiment and doing a military style work out
When we assembled at 11.00am it wasn't raining, it was blustery and to the south there were threatening rain clouds. There was a good turn out of families, friends, ex servicemen-including Chelsea Pensioners, and the usual posse of councillors and civic dignities
Birkdale born A J P Taylor grew up in a house overlooking this beach. His well known theories on the progress of WW1 include the observation that once events had been set in train there was no stopping them. It felt a bit like that this morning. We ended up forming the poppy in the driving rain. I am sure the children will remember the event. It was memorable.

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